Open quotation revisited

Sana08.07.2018
Hajmi165.02 Kb.

A pragmaticist feels the tug of semantics: Recanati’s “Open quotation revisited” 

Philippe De Brabanter 

Université Libre de Bruxelles 

As Recanati explains at the end of chapter 7, “Open quotation revisited” was  originally 

written with a view to doing mainly to things: (i) respond to papers on open quotation 

published  after  2001,  notably  in  the  collection  I  edited  as  volume  17  of  the  Belgian 

Journal  of  Linguistics  (De  Brabanter  2005a),  and  (ii)  reexamine  the  more  complex 

account  of  context-shifts  that  he  had  provided  in  Oratio  Obliqua,  Oratio  Recta.  As 

Recanati himself acknowledges, chapter 8 has a more semantic flavour than the nearly 

unconditionally pragmatic chapter 7. Towards the end of this paper, I will devote two 

sections to explaining why I think concessions to the semanticist are better avoided. 

 

I will begin by reviewing the three main topics of chapter 8, though in a different 

order.  First,  I  discuss  Recanati’s  treatment  of  the  widely  debated  question  of  the 

cancellability of the utterance ascription to the reportee in MQ. Second, I devote some 

time to an assessment of Recanati’s response to the strong objections that Bart Geurts & 

Emar  Maier  (2005)  voiced  against  ‘two-dimensional’  theories  of  hybrid  quotation 

(among which they included Recanati’s). Third, I comment on Recanati’s reappraisal of 

his own account of context-shifts. 

1 Cancellability and ambiguity 

Several authors hold that it is part of the semantic contribution of MQ that the quoted 

string is ascribed to the reportee (the referent of the subject of the reporting verb). This 

view  is  expressed  notably  by  Benbaji  (2005),  Cappelen  &  Lepore  (1997,  2005), 

McCullagh (2007). (I shall focus on Cappelen & Lepore, as their analysis has been by 

far the most influential.) These authors take this ‘utterance ascription to the reportee’ to 

be  an  entailment  of  MQ.  This  may  seem  surprising,  since  there  are  apparently  quite 

straightforward  counterexamples  to  this  claim.  It  appears  easy  to  cancel  the  putative 

entailment,  which  therefore  turns  out  to  be  a  pragmatic  inference  instead.  Take  the 

following  pair  of  examples.  In  (1),  it  is  very  tempting  to  ascribe  the  quoted  words  to 

Alice. Yet, the acceptability of (2) suggests that that ascription is cancellable: 

(1) Alice said that life 

‘is difficult to understand’

.  

(2) Alice said that life 

‘is difficult to understand’

, to use Rupert’s favourite phrase.  

In (2) the quoted words are ascribed to Rupert, not to the reportee, Alice.  

1

  In  the  face  of  examples  like  these,  how  can  one  continue  to  defend  the 

‘entailment’ story? By invoking the critic’s failure to distinguish between cancellation 

and recourse to another sense of an ambiguous  expression. The argument then is that 

2

 At least — and this is what matters — this reading is possible. But perhaps the quoted words can be  

1

simultaneously ascribed to both Alice and Rupert.

 Ambiguity is a vague term, covering both the linguist’s ‘polysemy’ and ‘homonymy’. I shall stick to it, 

2

however,  because  most  discussions  of  this  kind  in  the  philosophical  literature  are  framed  in  terms  of 

ambiguity.

the  metalinguistic  comment  shows  that  the  words  between  inverted  commas  are  not 

mixed-quoted, but, say, scare-quoted instead. 

 

Generally,  ambiguity-based  analyses  are  dispreferred,  because  they  are  at  odds 

with Grice’s ‘Modified Occam’s Razor’, which states that one should avoid multiplying 

senses  if  their  postulation  does  no  more  descriptive  or  explanatory  work  than  an 

independently justified general pragmatic mechanism. The principle is a difficult one to 

apply,  though  (cf.  Sperber  &  Wilson  2005:  469),  and  judgments  as  to  which  account 

does more useful work may be tricky to make. So it is not entirely surprising that the 

literature  on  quotation  does  feature  a  few  theories  that  appeal  to  ambiguity.   The 

3

question  is  this:  other  than  the  somewhat  arbitrary  application  of  Modified  Occam’s 

Razor, how can one reject an ambiguity-based account? The best way to go, it seems, is 

to attempt to show that the meaning distinction posited is ad hoc, or untenable in some 

other way. This is exactly what Recanati sets out to do. First, he submits variants of an 

example similar to (1), along the lines of: 

(3) Alice said that life 

‘is difficult to understand’

, as she put it. 

(4) Alice said that life 

‘is difficult to understand’

, to use her favourite phrase. 

The  quoted  words  are  explicitly  ascribed  to  the  reportee,  Alice,  by  means  of  a 

metalinguistic  comment.  So  far,  these  examples  are  compatible  with  both  Recanati’s 

account  (explicitation  of  a  pragmatic  inference)  and  Cappelen  &  Lepore’s  (double 

ascription of the utterance to Alice). But then, Recanati offers minimal variations on (3) 

and (4): 

(5) Alice said that life 

‘is difficult to understand’

, as Rupert would put it. 

(2) [repeated] Alice said that life 

‘is difficult to understand’

, to use Rupert’s favourite 

phrase.  

4

Now  the  quoted  utterance  is  ascribed  to  Rupert.  Recanati’s  reasoning  goes  like  this: 

there seems to be every reason to put (3) and (4) on a par with (1): all of them involve 

MQ. Furthermore, since (2) and (5) only differ from (3) and (4) by one NP, they should 

be judged to exhibit MQ as well. Yet, Cappelen & Lepore would (have to) say that they 

involve scare quoting (ScQ) instead, a judgment that now appears ad hoc. 

 

This is not a logically conclusive demonstration, but I take it that it does shift the 

onus  on  ambiguity  theorists  to  show  that  their  assumption  that  different  meanings  (or 

uses)  of  the  quotation  marks  are  involved  in  (2)  and  (5)  is  not  arbitrary.  Overall,  I 

believe  that  the  strategy  that  consists  in  questioning  the  boundaries  between  MQ  and 

ScQ is worth pursuing. In my opinion, too many authors — this includes Recanati — 

 To my knowledge, Gómez-Torrente (2005, 2011) is the only one to fully articulate a theory on which 

3

quotation  marks  have  several  conventional  meanings.  However,  both  Cappelen  &  Lepore  (2005)  and 

Benbaji (2005) appeal to strategies that resemble appeals to ambiguity (although they are at pains to deny 

postulations of ambiguity), and Geurts & Maier write that “quotation marks seem to be polysemous rather 

than just ambiguous” (2005: 127). 

 Should you have any trouble with these examples, think of modalised sentences like Alice might say that 

4 life ‘is difficult to understand’, to use your favourite expression.

have accorded far too much importance to Cappelen & Lepore’s original definition of 

MQ.  Though  interesting  in  their  own  right,  notably  because  of  their  alleged  truth-

conditional  effects,  the  Cappelen  &  Lepore  examples  have  resulted  in  theorists 

sometimes ‘not seeing the forest for the trees’. From the perspective of an empirically 

sound  theory  of  quotation,  there  is  no  particular  reason  to  give  Cappelen  &  Lepore’s 

MQ  precedence  over  other  hybrid  cases.  I  will  add  that  that  is  so  even  if  one’s  main 

concern is with truth-conditions. Thus, it is not clear that the quotations in examples like 

(6) and (7) below have no impact on truth-conditions. None the less, they are certainly 

not amenable to a Cappelen & Lepore-type analysis, because they do not come under 

the scope of an obvious reporting verb: 

(6) Chateaubriand returned to France in 1800, 

‘with the century’

. (Recanati 2010: 272) 

(7) Mrs. Obama described herself as a “110-percenter,” which is how much she said she 

gives of herself to both her family and her job, which means she always feels “

like I’m 

failing

.”  

The hybrid quotation in (7) is especially interesting because it includes an indexical, I. 

Clearly, it has a truth-conditional effect here (it shifts the context). Left with a choice 

between  semantic  MQ  and  pragmatic  ScQ,  Cappelen  &  Lepore  would  not  be  able  to 

account for this. In the end, I believe there are good reasons to hold that MQ and ScQ 

do not exhaust the domain of hybrid open quotations. It is not even clear that MQ and 

ScQ can be neatly distinguished in a non ad-hoc manner.  I conclude that appealing to 

5

ambiguity in order to claim there is no cancellation of the ‘utterance ascription to the 

reportee’ in MQ is a strategy that fails. 

2 Two-dimensionality 

In their 2005 paper, Bart Geurts and Emar Maier outline a presuppositional account of 

hybrid  quotation  (which  they  call  ‘mixed’).  This  is  deliberately  intended  as  a  one-

dimensional  theory,  because,  as  they  see  it,  two-dimensional  theories  face  major 

difficulties.  In  their  critique,  they  focus  on  Potts  (2007),  the  most  fully  worked  out 

account from a formal point of view, but they add that “although we will confine our 

attention  to  one  particular  version  [of  two-dimensionality],  our  criticism  is  directed 

against the whole family of 2D theories” (2005: 111), and this includes Recanati (2001) 

and Predelli (2003), to which I would add Cappelen & Lepore (1997, 2005) and García-

Carpintero (2005). 

 

Consider: 

(8) When in Santa Cruz, Peter orders 

‘[eɪ]pricots’

 at the local market. 

 For a more detailed critical assessment of the distinction between MQ and ScQ, see De Brabanter (2010: 

5

115-117). García-Carpintero is among the few authors who have made allowances for “cases in between 

mixed  quotations  and  scare  quotes,  i.e.,  cases  in  which  there  is  in  the  background  a  direct-discourse 

ascription to a speaker, but the utterance itself is not a saying-ascription” (2011: 129).



Potts’s (2007) theory states that two propositions are expressed, one independent of the 

quotation  —  the  ‘use’  line  below  —,  the  other  reflecting  the  ‘speech  report’,  the 

‘mention’ line below.  

6

Use: 

When in Santa Cruz, Peter orders apricots at the local market. 

           

Mention:  Peter utters ‘[eɪ]pricots’. 

    


According to Geurts & Maier, a first problem for this account is that it doesn’t capture 

the  most  obvious  interpretation  of  (8),  namely  that  “when  Peter  is  in  Santa  Cruz  and 

buys apricots at the local market, he says ‘[eɪ]pricots’. They suggest that the additional 

restriction might result from the quotation being in focus: “the restriction observed in 

this case coincides with the complete regular meaning (in Potts’s terms) of ‘Peter orders 

‘[eɪ]pricots’ at the local market’” (2005: 112), and not as is usual, with “backgrounded 

information in [the] scope [of the quantifier]” (2005). They are sceptical that the two-

dimensional analysis can account for the focus effect observed. 

 

What  they  see  as  an  even  more  pressing  problem  arises  in  connection  with  an 

example  like  (9),  in  which  the  most  natural  reading  has  it  that  each  soldier  said 

‘mommy’ to refer to his own mother, something which is not captured by the mention 

line underneath: 

(9) Every soldier said he longed to go home to his 

‘mommy’

Use: 

Every soldier said he longed to go home to his mommy. 

           

Mention:  Every soldier uttered ‘mommy’. 

    

Geurts & Maier point out further problems with metalinguistic negation and conclude 

that  the  two-dimensional  analysis  is  ill-equipped  to  account  for  cases,  like  the  above, 

where there is rich interaction between the two postulated levels of meaning. 

 

In addressing Geurts & Maier’s critique, Recanati acknowledges from the outset 

that the theory set out in chapter 7 is multi-dimensional: 

On  the  version  of  this  view  I  put  forward  in  chapter  7,  any  of  [several 

examples containing a hybrid quotation] compositionally expresses a certain 

proposition  —  the  same  it  would  express  without  the  quotation  marks  — 

and  use-conditionally  expresses  a  further  proposition  to  the  effect  that  the 

speaker is R-ing the enclosed words. In addition the utterance pragmatically 

conveys an array of propositions having to do with the speaker’s point in R-

ing the enclosed words. (2010: 275) 

In this citation, Recanati uses “R-ing” as a placeholder for a relation to be specified later 

in the chapter, so as to temporarily leave open the question of the conventional meaning 

of quotation marks. As we shall see in section 3, the choice will be between the broad 

 I have transformed Potts’s fully explicit formulas into plain English. 

6

“using  for  demonstrative  purposes”,  as  in  chapter  7,  and  the  narrower  “using 

echoically”. 

 

I  showed  in  the  essay  devoted  to  chapter  7  that  Recanati  recognises  the  rich 

interaction  between  the  meaning  of  a  quotation  and  truth-conditional  content.  Unlike 

Potts  (2007),  he  has  available  a  couple  of  tools  that  are  designed  to  capture  the 

interactions between levels, namely free pragmatic enrichment and context-shifts. These 

two mechanisms are quite capable of explaining indirect effects of pragmatic meaning 

upon an utterance’s (intuitive) truth-conditions. 

 

With respect to free enrichment, Recanati basically repeats his analysis of MQ: 

if the quotational point is to make the addressee understand that the quoted words were 

uttered by the agent of the speech event, that point will enrich the truth-conditions of the 

utterance.  In  other  words,  the  contextual  meaning  of  the  quotation  affects  the  truth-

conditional content. His conclusion: “One may deny that free enrichment exists, but if it 

exists,  then  it  provides  an  explanation  of  the  interaction  of  semantic  content  and 

quotational meaning in [MQ] that is fully compatible both with multi-dimensionalism 

and with a pragmatic approach to open quotation” (2010: 279). 

 

Now it seems to me that Geurts & Maier’s criticism goes further and concerns 

aspects of meaning that are perhaps less easy to deal with than basic MQ. In the next 

couple of paragraphs, I will therefore propose what I take to be a Recanati-style analysis 

of examples (8)-(9), and see how it fares. Let us begin with (8). Geurts & Maier’s idea 

was that, as a result of the quotation being in focus, there is an extra domain restriction 

affecting  its  interpretation,  and  that  Potts’s  separation  between  the  regular  and  the 

quotational meaning makes it difficult for him to capture this interaction. The difference 

between Potts and Recanati is that the latter makes allowances for pragmatic intrusions 

into  truth-conditions.  Elsewhere,  he  has  provided  analyses  of  quantifier  domain 

restriction  in  terms  of  free  pragmatic  enrichment  (2004:  87-88,  2010:  section  6.1  of 

chapter 3), and I shall do likewise here: probably helped by the intonational focus on 

[eɪ]pricots,  the  addressee  understands  that  one  major  aspect  of  the  meaning  of  (8)  — 

closely  linked  with  the  quotational  point  —   is  the  West  Coast  pronunciation  of 

7 apricots. This may help him see that (8) does not convey that “all the time that Peter is 

in  Santa  Cruz,  he  is  (constantly)  buying  apricots  at  the  local  market”.  The  inference 

about the quotational point together with our world knowledge (people are not normally 

buying fruit all the time) seems enough to trigger the extra contextual restriction which 

affects the truth-conditions of (8). 

 

I have little reason to assume that Geurts & Maier would disagree with this sort 

of account. Note that they themselves offered no detailed explanation of how the extra 

domain  restriction  arose  in  the  first  place  (merely  suggesting  the  influence  of 

intonational focus), and they might therefore be open to the free enrichment account. An 

extra argument stems from the following observation: the disquoted counterpart of (8) 

seems to lend itself to at least two salient readings: 

(8

DISQ

) When in Santa Cruz, Peter orders apricots at the local market. 

 The likely quotational point here is “getting the addressee to understand that people on the West Coast 

7

of the USA pronounce apricots /ᴵeɪprɪkɒts/”.



Reading a: “every time Peter is in Santa Cruz, he goes to the local market and orders 

apricots” 

Reading b: “every time Peter is in Santa Cruz and goes to the local market, he orders 

apricots there”. 

I take it that the place of the intonational focus will favour one or the other reading.  On 

8

reading  a,  there  is  no  extra  domain  restriction.  But  on  reading  b,  there  is.  Now  this 

restriction is different from that in (8), but that is not what matters here. The important 

point is that there should be a restriction at all, in the absence of any quoting. The lesson 

I wish to draw from this is that the requirement for a satisfactory account of both (8) and 

(8

DISQ

)  is,  first  and  foremost,  that  it  incorporate  (something  like)  free  enrichment.  So, 

where Geurts & Maier thought they had found fault with two-dimensional accounts of 

quotation  in  general,  the  problem  may  actually  have  been  with  two-dimensional 

frameworks  that  did  not  allow  for  free  enrichment.  I’d  go  even  further  than  that. The 

problem  was  probably  not  with  two-dimensional  accounts  per  se,  but  with  those 

frameworks  that  include  nothing  like  free  enrichment,  irrespective  of  the  number  of 

meaning dimensions they postulate. 

 

Turning now to (9), we see that the extra meaning component posited by Geurts 

& Maier does not affect the truth-conditions of the utterance, which are neatly captured 

by the use line. In Recanati’s parlance, the extra component is entirely a matter of the 

pictorial meaning. The quotation marks (in speech, some intonational feature) indicate 

that  the  word  mommy  is  produced  for  demonstrative  purposes.  The  addressee  fleshes 

this out by identifying an internal target: the word mommy is used echoically, mimicking 

each soldier’s use of the word to refer to his own mother. This is the expected result. 

Though  impressionistic,  the  Recanati-like  account  probably  gives  a  good  idea  of  how 

Geurts  &  Maier  themselves  hit  upon  the  notion  that  each  token  of  mommy  was  not 

merely uttered, as the mention line of the Potts-like analysis suggests, but uttered to talk 

about a particular person. 

 

I conclude that Recanati’s two-dimensional theory is sufficiently different from 

Potts’s to withstand Geurts & Maier’s objections. It is equipped with conceptual tools 

that enable it to capture refinements that are inaccessible to a formally more precise but 

pragmatically poorer two-dimensional picture like Potts’s.  

9

3 Are context-shifts encoded in the conventional meaning of quotation marks after 

all? 

Still, Recanati feels, a challenge remains. The fact that the tough examples brought up 

by Geurts & Maier can be dealt with by his two-dimensional framework does not prove 

that  the  latter  is  superior  to  Geurts  &  Maier’s  one-dimensional  semantic  theory  of 

 At first blush, unmarked focus on market would favour reading a, while reading b would be facilitated 

8

by  marked  focus  on  apricots. The  latter  might  signal  a  contrast  with,  say,  peaches,  rather  than  with  an 

East Coast pronunciation /ᴵæprɪkɒts/, as in the quotational example (8).

  This  is  not  meant  to  diminish  the  merits  of  Potts  (2007),  which  offers  a  fully  worked  out  grammar, 

9

something  that  Recanati  does  not  do.  I’ll  return  to  the  issue  of  the  differences  between  semantic  and 

pragmatic accounts in the concluding remarks to this paper.

hybrids. Recanati is willing to face the challenge, and possibly to reconsider his views, 

as we shall see. 

 

Recanati  remarks  that  the  account  of  non-cumulative  hybrids  in  chapter  7 

involves a revision of the classic Kaplanian framework (Kaplan 1989). As stipulated by 

Kaplan, semantics assigns a character, namely a function from contexts to contents, to a 

sentence.  The  problem  with  sentences  containing  non-cumulative  hybrids  is  that  no 

single context (the ‘current’ one, or the ‘shifted/source’ one) yields the right content.  

10

Now one may decide to give up the notion that whole sentences have characters, so that 

“only simple expressions will be assigned characters: for more complex expressions like 

sentences,  we  will  directly  compose  the  contents  determined  by  the  characters  of  the 

parts in their respective contexts” (2010: 283). But, Recanati points out, we may prefer 

to  keep  the  Kaplanian  framework  unchanged.  One  way  of  doing  this  is  to  make  the 

context-shift  “internal  to  the  character  of  the  sentence  [...]  by  assigning  to  the  sub-

clausal quotation  a metalinguistic character, which maps the context in which the sub-

11

clausal  quotation  occurs  (viz.  the  current  context)  to  the  content  expressed  by  the 

enclosed expression when interpreted in the source context” (ibid.).  This analysis, put 

12

forward  in  Oratio  Obliqua,  Oratio  Recta,  still  leaves  open  the  question  whether 

quotation marks are interpreted as the syntactic vehicle for the context-shifting operator. 

If they are not, the operator is simply a tool of the metalanguage, and the context-shift 

remains  a  fully  pragmatic  mechanism  operating  at  the  pre-semantic  level.  If  they  are, 

however, then context-shifts are semanticised, in the sense that they are now effected by 

a linguistic device, the quotation marks themselves.  

13

 This is an overstatement. There are cases in which the shifted context will yield the right content, albeit 

10

in a manner that cannot satisfy the theorist. Consider a variation on (6): 

(6’) ‘Quine’ wants to have breakfast. 

The current context would yield the wrong content, since (6’) would be construed as being about the real 

Quine. By contrast, the shifted context (James’s) yields the right content, provided the other words in the 

sentence  receive  the  same  interpretation  in  ordinary  English  and  in  James’s  idiolect/from  James’s 

perspective (this was the reason for removing the indexical us from the example). Still, the latter analysis 

is unsatisfactory because it does not differentiate between an utterance of (6’) and one, say, of: 

(6’’) ‘Quine wants to have breakfast’, 

where the quotation takes scope over the whole sentence. 

One more point: Recanati himself explicitly makes allowances for cases like (6’) when he describes some 

context-shifts as ‘benign’ (2010: 286; see below). 

 Clausal/sub-clausal are terms from Potts (2007). I prefer hybrid/non-hybrid, however, because: 

11

(i) there are instances of so-called ‘sub-clausal’ open quotation that are clausal after all, e.g. Her idea 

that  

“Feminist  studies  should,  by  definition,  entail  respect  for  the  views  and  intentions  of 

authors”

 (238) ought, in fact, to have been extended to her discussion of other plays. (mclc.osu.edu/

rc/pubs/reviews/liruru.htm); 

(ii) Potts’s clausal applies to open and closed quotations, regardless; 

(iii) there  are  instances  of  so-called  ‘clausal’  open  quotation  that  prove  less  than  clausal,  e.g.  

‘In  the 

fridge?’

 What on earth was it doing there?.

 In this chapter, ‘echoic use’ and ‘context-shifting use’ are used interchangeably.

12

 I have not been able to pin Geurts & Maier down to either position. Nowhere in their (2005) do they 

13

say  explicitly  that  their  meaning-shifts  are  triggered  by  the  quotation  marks.  In  later  writings,  though, 

Maier writes that English (as opposed to e.g. Ancient Greek) requires quotation marks in order to achieve 

meaning-shifts.  (Maier  2012).  In  this  case,  it  is  quite  clear  that  he  is  talking  about  syntactic  quotation 

marks. In previous work, he made a distinction between the latter and semantic quotation marks: “There 

are  well-known  constructions,  even  in  English,  that  are  completely  unmarked,  intonationally  and 

orthographically, yet contain quotation marks semantically” (2007). I have not been able to determine if 

these semantic quotation marks belong to the object-language or to the metalanguage.



 

Interestingly,  whereas  Recanati  opted  for  the  pragmatic  alternative  in  Oratio 

Obliqua,  Oratio  Recta,  he  now  concedes  that  the  issue  is  controversial,  and  declares 

himself ready to reassess the conventional meaning of quotation marks in hybrids. 

 

He begins his assessment by showing that the pragmaticist cannot make use of 

the  following  objection:  “though  non-cumulative  hybrids  are  (usually)  echoic,  they 

involve no context-shift since they do not affect the truth-conditions of the utterance in 

which  they  occur”.  With  reason,  Recanati  dismisses  this  objection:  in  modifying  the 

character  of  an  expression,  context-shifts  need  not  affect  their  content;  they  may  be 

‘benign’. Now, if it turned out that all uses of quotation marks in hybrids are echoic, it 

would  be  tempting  to  say  that  quotation-marks-as-used-in-hybrids  conventionally 

encode echoicity, rather than just a demonstrative intention. 

 

In  chapter  7,  Recanati  offered  the  quotation  in  (10)  as  an  illustration  of  flat 

mention in hybrid quotation: 

(10) A ‘fortnight’ is a period of fourteen days. 

His  revised  opinion  is  that  this  sort  of  example  alone  cannot  refute  the  view  that 

quotation marks encode echoicity. It does not seem illegitimate, at any rate, to say that 

the display of fortnight echoes a sort of generic speaker, something like ‘the competent 

English  speaker’.  Given  the  current  state  of  our  knowledge,  Recanati  judges  himself 

unable to determine whether there exist unmistakable examples of non-echoic hybrids. 

 

If  further  empirical  research  should  find  no  instances  of  non-echoic  hybrids, 

then,  Recanati  volunteers,  he  would  be  ready  to  adopt  Geurts  &  Maier’s 

presuppositional  analysis,  which  he  deems  very  similar  to  the  analysis  in  terms  of  a 

metalinguistic  character.  That,  however,  would  make  context-shifts  a  semantic 

phenomenon:  in  Geurts  &  Maier’s  analysis,  presupposition  is  a  kind  of  anaphora  that 

needs to be resolved as part of semantic interpretation. Exit the pre-semantic analysis, 

then. 


 

Still,  Recanati  feels  that  this  concession  to  semanticists  does  not  mean  that  a 

proper  treatment  of  quotation  can  do  without  two  dimensions.  One  still  needs  to  deal 

with the quotational point. “If we leave aside what I called ‘the contextual meaning of 

the quotation’, we get only a truncated account” (2010: 289). 

 

 I definitely agree with Recanati. However, I feel that few philosophers would 

not. After all, even diehard semanticists-about-quotation like Cappelen & Lepore devote 

entire pages to the pragmatics of quotation (2005: 55-57), and it is clear that they defend 

a dual approach distinguishing between semantics and ‘speech-act heuristics’. There is 

worse,  I  believe.  If  Recanati  grants  that  the  meaning  of  quotation  marks  in  open 

quotation is echoic while at the same time maintaining, correctly, that there are cases of 

closed  quotation  that  are  not  echoic,  he  tacitly  admits  that  quotation  marks  are 

polysemous. 

4. Why resist the semanticisation of quotation marks? 

I  identify  the  multiplication  of  senses  as  one  of  the  tools  available  to  the  semanticist 

when  it  comes  to  accommodating  phenomena  or  properties  uncovered  by  the 

pragmaticist. Recall that we saw in section 1 how Recanati disposed of the objections to 

the possibility of cancelling utterance ascription to the reportee in mixed quotation. In 

retrospect,  this  looks  like  a  Pyrrhic  victory.  Pending  the  results  of  further  empirical 

enquiry, Recanati is poised to accept that there are two meanings (or uses) of quotation 

marks: one simply consists in signalling a demonstration, the other encodes echoicity, 

i.e.  takes  the  meaning  of  the  quoted  string  ‘σ’  to  be  something  like  “what  echoed 

speaker X means by ‘σ’”. Though not negligible, the only difference with the distinct 

meaning that Recanati rejected earlier is that the quoted utterance is ascribed to some 

agent (to be contextually determined) rather than systematically to the reportee. 

 

The first question to ask is whether there are non-echoic hybrids? It does seem 

that  examples  like  (10)  —  the  fortnight  type  —  behave  differently  from  their  closed 

counterparts. Thus, the addition of a metalinguistic comment such as as X says (in L) 

seems more felicitous in (10) than in (11): 

  

(10’) A ‘fortnight’, as one says in English, is a period of fourteen days. 

(11) ‘Fortnight’ is a noun. 

(11’) ? ‘Fortnight’, as one says in English, is a noun. 

This possible difference in acceptability between (10’) and (11’) may be grist to the mill 

of the theorist who leans towards generalised echoicity in hybrid quotation: in (10’), it is 

the  ‘generic  English  speaker’  who  is  echoed,  and  this  may  be  what  (10)  implicitly 

conveys too. However, the data are rather complex. Consider: 

(12) ‘AWOL’ means “absent from one’s post but without intent to desert”. 

(12’) ‘AWOL’, as they say in the army, means “absent from one’s post but without 

intent to desert”. 

In  (12),  we  have  a  closed  metalinguistic  citation.  Yet,  a  metalinguistic  comment 

suggesting  an  echoed  speaker  seems  perfectly  acceptable  here.  If  anything,  this 

confirms Recanati’s claim that a thoroughgoing empirical study is needed. 

 

Our current inability to settle the above question doesn’t have to mean that we 

must leave the issue aside until further notice. I believe that a case can be made against 

‘going the Geurts & Maier way’ even if it should turn out that there are no non-echoic 

hybrid  quotations.  My  main  arguments  will  be  that  it  is  better  (i)  to  steer  clear  of  an 

ambiguity theory of quotation marks, and (ii) to avoid splitting the theory of quotation 

into one theory of written instances and another theory of spoken ones. 

 

I  hinted  above  that  ambiguity  theories  are  more  typical  of  semantic  than 

pragmatic accounts. What all ambiguity accounts agree on is that quotation marks have 

distinct  conventional  meanings.  But  they  may  regard  the  role  of  quotation  marks  as 

being more or less important to the generation of quotations, i.e. they may be more or 

less  semantically-orientated.  As  I  see  it,  the  relevant  positions  are  defined  by  the 

answers to the following three questions: 

(a) do spoken and written quotations work on the same mechanisms? Is it legitimate to 

try  and  devise  an  integrated  theory  of  quotation  that  applies  across  the  board  to 

spoken and written instances? 

(b) do  spoken  quotations  also  have  quotation  marks  (i.e.  some  intonational  or 

paralinguistic counterpart to quotation marks)? 

(c) are quotation marks necessary to the generation of quotation, or are they optional? 

 

To  begin  with  question  (a),  I  believe  the  theory  laid  out  in  chapter  7  is  an 

integrated theory of quotation, emphasising the pictorial dimension of the interpretation 

of  all  quotational  utterances.  This  theory,  though  illustrated  with  mainly  written 

examples is clearly also intended (actually even more strikingly so) to have relevance to 

spoken quotations. It is also an account that gives pride of place to the quoter, and to 

how the quoter exploits a variety of tools (only a few of them conventional) to mark a 

string  as  quoted  and  to  guide  the  addressee  towards  a  correct  apprehension  of  the 

quotational point. 

 

It seems to me that the ambiguity theorist is at risk of pushing the quoter into the 

background and of giving up on an integrated theory. Whether she does depends on how 

she answers questions (b) and (c). Below, I sketch what I take to be the main theoretical 

positions defined by answers to (b) and (c): 

position 1: There is no quotation without quotation marks. Any putative counterexample 

will  be  explained  away  as  no  more  than  apparent.  There  are  several  ways  of  dealing 

with  (apparently)  unmarked  quotations,  which  I  can  only  hint  at  here:   unmarked 

14

‘quotations’  are  simply  not  quotations  (e.g.  Cappelen  &  Lepore  2005);  unmarked 

quotations  trigger  blatantly  false  readings  that  require  pragmatic  repair  (cf.  García-

Carpintero 2004, Gómez-Torrente 2005); ‘unmarked’ quotations are marked in logical 

form (and/or in syntax) even when the marks are invisible at the surface of things. The 

surprisingly  popular  view  of  the  indispensability  of  quotation  marks  is  the  most 

profoundly  semantic  one  that  I  can  make  out.  When  taken  to  apply  only  to  written 

instances, it has the additional consequence of ruling out any integrated account. When 

taken to apply to both speech and writing, it is compatible with an integrated account, 

albeit  one  that  plays  down  the  pictorial  dimension  and  the  role  of  the  quoter:  it  is 

quotation marks that ‘do the quoting’.  

position  2:  Quotation  marks  exist  in  both  writing  and  speech.  If  tenable,  this  view  is 

consistent  with  an  integrated  theory.  Moreover,  if  quotation  marks  are  taken  to  be 

optional, the theory does not have to downplay the role of the quoter. But is it tenable? 

So  far,  no  one  has  been  able  to  show  that  speech  uses  anything  like  the  conventional 

quotation marks of writing. That doesn’t mean there never are any marks of quoting in 

speech,  there  are,  but  these  are  variable  and  it’s  unclear  that  they  are  more  than 

indicators  triggering  some  pragmatic  inference  as  to  the  occurrence  of  a  quotation.  

15

Admittedly, a lot more empirical work needs to be done into this question, but at this 

stage it would be awkward for an ambiguity theorist to adopt position 2. 

 See De Brabanter, “Quoteless quotations” (in preparation), for details.

14

  In  the  sparse  literature  on  the  subject,  the  conclusions  tend  to  be  negative:  “[

i]t  would  be  an 

15

overstatement to claim that prosodic marking is used systematically as a sign of reported speech in talk 

the way quotation marks are in texts” (Klewitz & Couper-Kuhlen 1999: 473; see also Kasimir 2008)

”.


position  3:  quotation  marks  are  optional  in  writing  and  have  no  conventional 

counterpart in speech. This is certainly the more pragmatic position, and the one that I 

suppose  Recanati  would  opt  for  if  he  ended  up  adopting  Geurts  &  Maier’s  view  on 

hybrid quotation. Note, however, that Geurts & Maier seem to regard quotation marks 

as necessary in hybrid instances.  Indeed, a distinction could be made between optional 

16

marking in closed and autonomous open cases, and compulsory marking in hybrid ones. 

 

I do not think that Geurts & Maier are right on this point. It turns out that hybrid 

quotations may not be marked by quotation marks (or any other device) at all (cf. De 

Brabanter  2010:  113-115).  This  often  happens  in  allusions,  notably  allusions  to  well-

known  sayings  or  famous  literary  works.  In  those  cases,  the  utterer  may  choose  to 

somehow  help  her  addressee  (by  using  quotation  marks,  or  intonational  marking  in 

speech,  cf.  (13))  or  to  make  him  go  to  the  extra  effort  (and  reward)  of  detecting  the 

presence of the allusion himself ((14, 15)):  

17

(13)  ...  consider  this,  just  how  many  of  our  immigrants  are  

‘huddled  masses 

yearning  to  breathe  free’

?  And  how  many  are  coming  for  just  the  economic 

benefits? (https://www.economist.com/user/3070969/comments?page=2) 

(14)  BMP  files  weren’t  of  good  quality,  and,  since  

beauty  is  in  the  eye  of  the 

beholder

, I’ve pulled out some of the screens that I like. (BNC, HAC 4519) 

(15) So ended the attempts of these 

poor, yearning, tired huddled masses

 to gain 

asylum in the US. (New Statesman, 17/01/2000: 16) 

In (13), the writer quotes a line from the poem by Emma Lazarus that is inscribed on the 

base  of  the  Statue  of  Liberty,  the  symbol  for  the  United  States’  hospitality  towards 

immigrants. In (14), even in the absence of any signalling, beauty is in the eye of the 

beholder  is  sufficiently  well-known  to  be  widely  identified  as  an  echoic  hybrid 

quotation. Whether the citation will be rightly attributed to its originator (in this case, 

conventional  received  wisdom)  is  immaterial.  In  (15),  the  sequence  these  poor,  yearning, tired huddled masses is used to refer to a group of Haitians who had tried to 

enter  U.S.  territory  clandestinely.  It  evidently  conjures  up  Lazarus’s  poem,  with 

alterations. The original wording of the relevant passage is: 

(16) Give me your tired, your poor / Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free 

These alterations do not, I contend, prevent these well-known lines of the poem from 

being echoed. 

 

Other unmarked cases of (what are perhaps) hybrid quotations were offered long 

ago by Roman Jakobson (1985) in his sketch of the ‘metalingual function’ of language. 

Jakobson  claimed  that  definitional  examples  like  (17)  (and  (18))  “impart  information 

about the meaning assigned to the word hermaphrodite [...] but [...] say nothing about 

the ontological status of the individuals named” (1985: 119): 

 At least Maier (2012: 133) does, about English (though not Ancient Greek). Cf. footnote 13.

16

 J. Rey-Debove called such instances ‘crypto-citations’ (1978: 261).

17

(17) Hermaphrodites are individuals combining the sex organs of both male and female. 

(18) A sophomore is a second-year student. 

These examples are exactly like (10), were it not for the missing quotation marks, which 

are easy to supply: 

(17

Q )  ‘Hermaphrodites’  are  individuals  combining  the  sex  organs  of  both  male  and 

female. 

(18


Q

) A ‘sophomore’ is a second-year student. 

This suggests that (17)-(18) can possibly be regarded as unmarked hybrids. 

 

The  lesson  to  be  drawn  from  these  examples  is  this:  in  hybrid  instances, 

quotation marks are not systematically necessary to make the addressee understand that 

he is to ascribe a string of words to some echoed speaker. This highlights the fact that 

the quoter can, given the right circumstances, rely solely on contextual clues, with no 

need to signal the allusion with a dedicated linguistic marker. 

 

None  of  the  above  conclusively  shows  that  it  would  be  misguided  to  adopt  a 

one-dimensional semantics for quotation marks in hybrid quotations. Yet, it does make 

that option much less attractive. For one thing, if, as I’ve claimed is desirable (and in the 

spirit of TCP), the theorist seeks to devise an account of quotation that covers writing 

and  speech,  then  she  will  have  to  provide  a  pragmatic  explanation  of  how  quotation 

works in the absence of any conventional marking. And this she will have to do not just 

for  non-hybrid  but  also  for  hybrid  instances.  This  theory  exists:  it  is  the  radical 

pragmatic theory that Recanati defends in chapter 7. 

 

This, to me, means that it should be much less tempting to endorse a polysemic 

account,  even  if  only  for  written  quotations.  A  pragmatic  account  is  necessary  for 

written cases too, since we have seen that unmarked written instances exist both in the 

non-hybrid and the hybrid variety. One consequence is that quotation marks cannot be 

said to be a necessary ingredient of echoic quotation. If quotation marks are, as Geurts 

& Maier propose, context-shifting operators, then they are sufficiently powerful to ‘do 

the quoting’ by themselves. The role of the quoter is reduced to selecting the requisite 

means to achieve her communicative purpose. But examples like (14) and (15) show us 

that  it’s  the  quoter  who  does  the  quoting  (and  the  additional  echoing  in  the  relevant 

cases), and that she does not need quotation marks to that end. Since we have a theory 

that can deal with all varieties of quotation, there’s no need to take on the extra baggage 

of a partial theory (one of marked written hybrids) that requires (what now turns out to 

be an unnecessary) multiplication of senses. Here, the application of Modified Occam’s 

Razor seems to be fully warranted. 

 

In “Open quotation”, Recanati seemed to seize every opportunity to show why 

one  should  embrace  truth-conditional  pragmatics.  Most  of  the  effects  on  truth-

conditions  (except  those  resulting  from  recruitment  as  a  singular  term)  were 

convincingly  explained  in  terms  of  independently  justified  pragmatic  mechanisms.  In 

this  respect,  “Open  quotation  revisited”  takes  a  step  backward.  Most  earlier  critics  of 

Recanati’s  theory  of  quotation  found  fault  with  him  for  being  too  pragmatic  about 

quotation. Instead, my criticism is that the Recanati of chapter 8 may have responded 

too keenly to the tug of semantics.  

5. Conclusion and prospects 

I take François Recanati’s pragmatic theory of quotation to among the best. Though I 

have not refrained from criticising what I took to be less compelling aspects, only in a 

few cases have I made suggestions as to how to remedy the purported flaws. The critic’s 

‘destructive’ task is always easier than the author’s painstaking construction. 

 

I  suppose  I  should  stress  that  Recanati  somehow  makes  his  critic’s  life  easy, 

precisely  because  he  is  at  pains  to  provide  as  detailed  and  complete  a  depiction  as 

possible of the many mechanisms involved in the interpretation of quotation. It is this 

determination  to  leave  no  stone  unturned  that  inevitably  provides  his  critic  with 

opportunities for disagreement. 

 

A  typical  criticism  against  Recanati  is  voiced  by  Gómez-Torrente:  “With 

inspiration  from  Herbert  Clark,  François  Recanati  has  claimed  that  quotation  marks 

quite  generally  “conventionally  indicate  the  fact  that  the  speaker  is  demonstrating  the 

enclosed words” (2001: 680) [...]. It’s hard to make precise sense of this vague claim so 

that  it  can  seem  true  of  all  uses  of  quotation  but  not  of  any  other  use  of 

expressions”  (2005:  131-132;  my  italics).  I  understand  Gómez-Torrente’s  concern: 

pragmatic  theories  of  quotation  seem  to  inherently  exhibit  some  degree  of  vagueness 

(and intricacy). Recanati’s is no exception. This makes understandable the semanticist’s 

eagerness  to  offer  more  definite  characterisations  of  the  meaning  of  quotation,  via  a 

specification of the meaning(s) of quotation marks, conceived as necessary to quotation. 

This way the semanticist gets a good grip on the phenomenon and eschews vagueness. 

 

There  is,  however,  a  price  to  pay:  semantic  theories   tend  to  provide 

18

descriptions that are much more limited in scope. Thus, some semanticists dismiss one 

or other quotational phenomenon from the domain of quotation. Cappelen & Lepore’s 

treatment  of  scare  quoting  is  a  case  in  point.  But  there  were  precedents.  Peter  Geach 

judged that the mention of sheer nonsense (i.e. strings that do not correspond to actually 

existing  elements  of  any  language)  could  not  qualify  as  quotation,  and  therefore 

excluded such mentions from the data that the theory was accountable for (1957: 85). 

Nowadays, although most theorists grant that ‘just about anything’ can be quoted, be it 

linguistic  or  non-linguistic  material,  few  —  with  the  exception  of  a  couple  of 

pragmaticists-about-quotation like Recanati or, especially, Clark — attempt to account 

for  those  ‘quotations’  where  they  are  really  challenging,  i.e.  in  open  cases,  outside  of 

inertia-inducing  linguistic  recruitment.  Now,  it  is  possible  that  further  empirical 

research will show that certain phenomena which some now wish to include within the 

ambit of quotation do not belong there. My worry is that the semanticist, because of the 

tools at her disposal, will occasionally rule these out a priori.

 

 

Pragmaticists-about-quotation may seem to keep away from rigorous definitions 

and  the  kind  of  formalisations  that  enable  clear  predictions.  They  may  also  seem  to 

 As we saw in section 4, one can be more or less semantic-about-quotation. In the remaining paragraphs, 

18

the term ‘semantic theories’ will designate the radical accounts that regard quotation marks as necessary 

to quotation, and a theory of quotation marks as the right kind of theory of quotation.

engage in vaguer, less easily evaluable, language than semanticists. However, their best 

representatives  —  and  Recanati,  together  with  Clark  &  Gerrig  (1990),  certainly  ranks 

amongst the finest — truly engage with the complexity and variety of quoting in a way 

that the semanticist (so far, at least) seems to me incapable of doing. Only pragmaticists, 

so  far,  have  carefully  attended  to  the  fundamental  pictoriality  of  quotation.  Naturally, 

their  attempts  at  describing,  not  to  mention  explaining,  what  goes  on  in  the  various 

kinds of quoting do not yield the sorts of strong predictions that semanticists are looking 

for. But it is in the nature of pictorial meaning to be less definite than linguistic meaning 

(especially linguistic meaning as approached by the formal semanticist). Therefore, the 

relative vagueness of the analyses and predictions matches the actual vagueness of the 

interpretation of pictorial signalling. What the pragmaticists lose in precision, they gain 

in scope. 

 

 There is a major virtue to the semantic theories: they force the pragmaticist to 

become  more  and  more  precise.  While  the  pragmaticist  forces  the  semanticist  to 

develop frameworks capable of accounting for an ever increasing variety of data. It is a 

fact that recent developments in formal semantics have shown an ability to deal with a 

very broad range of data. Emar Maier’s work stands out in this respect. So, we might 

optimistically conclude: “let the interaction between semantics and pragmatics continue 

this way, and the theories will keep improving”. I still have a worry, though. That worry 

is very similar to the one Recanati voiced in the introduction to “Open quotation”: doing 

what the semanticist does, which in essence means regimenting quotation, involves the 

risk of turning the researcher’s attention away from the essential feature of quotation, its 

pictoriality:  at  bottom,  quotation  is  a  non-linguistic  communicative  act.  That  is 

something, I believe, that must escape the semanticist, simply because semantics is not 

designed to deal with ‘non-symbolic’ communicative behaviours, notably ‘iconic’ ones. 

What it can do is clarify certain important aspects of quotation, those in which linguistic 

elements do play a significant role. Semantics alone, however, can never offer a viable 

alternative  to  pragmatics  in  terms  of  empirical  coverage.  That  is  why  pragmaticists-

about-quotation must be wary of ‘going semantic’. The point is not simply a matter of 

defending  one’s  own  turf,  an  understandable  but  ultimately  irrational  goal,  but  to 

continue working towards the only sort of theory that can hope to describe and explain 

quotation, because it starts from the recognition of its essential pictorial quality.

 

References: 

Benbaji, Yitzhak. 2005. Who needs semantics of quotation marks?. Belgian Journal of  Linguistics 17.27-49. 

Cappelen, Herman, and Ernie Lepore. 1997. Varieties of Quotation. Mind 106.429-50. 

Cappelen,  Herman,  and  Ernie  Lepore.  2005  Varieties  of  quotation  revisited.  Belgian  Journal of Linguistics 17.51-75. 

Clark, Herb H., and Richard J. Gerrig. 1990. Quotations as demonstrations. Language 

66.764-805. 

De  Brabanter,  Philippe  (ed).  2005a.  Hybrid  Quotation.  Amsterdam:  John  Benjamins. 

(Belgian Journal of Linguistics 17) 

De  Brabanter,  Philippe.  2010.  The  semantics  and  pragmatics  of  hybrid  quotations.  Language and Linguistics Compass 4-2.107-120. 

De Brabanter, Philippe. In preparation. Quoteless quotations. 

García-Carpintero, M. 2004. The Deferred Ostension theory of quotation. Noûs 38.674–

692. 


García-Carpintero,  Manuel.  2005.  Double-duty  quotation:  the  deferred  ostension 

account. Belgian Journal of Linguistics 17.89-108. 

García-Carpintero,  Manuel.  2011.  Double-duty  quotation,  conventional  implicatures 

and  What  Is  Said.  In  Elke 

Brendel,  Jörg  Meibauer,  Markus  Steinbach 

(eds), 


Understanding Quotation. Berlin/New York: de Gruyter, 107-138. 

Geach,  Peter  T.  1957.  Mental  Acts.  Their  Content  and  Their  Objects.  London: 

Routledge & Kegan Paul.

 

Geurts,  Bart,  and  Emar  Maier.  2005.  Quotation  in  context.  Belgian  Journal  of 

Linguistics 17.109-28. 

Gómez-Torrente,  Mario.  2005.  Remarks  on  impure  quotation.  Belgian  Journal  of 

Linguistics 17.129-51. 

Gómez-Torrente,  Mario.  2011.  What  quotations  refer  to.  In  Elke 

Brendel,  Jörg 

Meibauer, Markus Steinbach 

(eds), Understanding Quotation. Berlin/New York: de 

Gruyter, 139-160. 

Kaplan,  David.  1989.  Demonstratives.  In  Joseph  Almog,  John  Perry  and  Howard 

Wettstein (eds), Themes from Kaplan. New York/Oxford: Oxford University Press, 

481-563. 

Kasimir, Elke. 2008. Prosodic correlates of subclausal quotation marks. ZAS 49.67-78. 

Klewitz,  Gabriele  &  Couper-Kuhlen,  Elizabeth.  1999.  Quote-unquote.  The  role  of 

prosody  in  the  contextualization  of  reported  speech  sequences.  Pragmatics 

9.459-85.  

McCullagh, Mark. 2007. Understanding mixed quotation. Mind 116.927–46. 

Maier, Emar. 2007. Quotation marks as monsters, or the other way around? In M. Aloni, 

P. Dekker, F. Roelofsen (eds), Proceedings of the Sixteenth Amsterdam Colloquium, 

Amsterdam, ILLC, 145-150. 

Maier,  Emar.  2012.  Switches  between  direct  and  indirect  speech  in  Ancient  Greek. 

Journal of Greek Linguistics 12.118-139. 

Potts, Chris. 2007. The dimensions of quotation. In Chris Barker and Pauline Jacobson 

(eds), Direct compositionality. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 405-31. 

Predelli,  Stefano.  2003.  Scare  quotes  and  their  relation  to  other  semantic  issues. 

Linguistics and Philosophy 26.1-28. 

Recanati,  François.  2000.  Oratio  Obliqua,  Oratio  Recta:  an  essay  on 

metarepresentation. Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press, Bradford Books. 

Recanati, François. 2001. Open quotation. Mind 110.637-87. 

Recanati, François. 2004. Literal Meaning. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. 

Recanati,  François.  2008.  Open  quotation  revisited.  Philosophical  Perspectives 

22.443-471. 

Recanati, François. 2010. Truth-Conditional Pragmatics. Oxford: Clarendon Press. 



Rey-Debove, Josette (1978) Le   Métalangage.   Etude   linguistique   du   discours   sur   le  langage. Paris: Le Robert. 

Sperber,  Dan  &  Wilson,  Deirdre.  2005.  Pragmatics.  In  Frank  Jackson  and  Michael 

Smith  (eds),  Oxford  Handbook  of  Contemporary  Philosophy.  Oxford:  Oxford 

University Press, 468-501. 




Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:

©2018 Учебные документы
Рады что Вы стали частью нашего образовательного сообщества.
?


operaciya-nalozheniya.html

operaciya-vtoraya-.html

operaciyali-zhjeler--.html

operaciyali-zhjen-negzg.html

operaiuni-pe-pieele.html